Tuesday, 6 September 2011

Year 10 Homework

Greetings new Year 10s...

The first part of your homework is to cover your book with a geographical theme.

The second part of your homework is to leave a comment on the blog, with an interesting geographical fact. Do your best to tell me something I don't know already... There might be a prize for the most interesting fact!

To leave a comment, you need to click on the "Comments" button at the bottom of this post. Type your comment, and then enter the "captcha". You should not need to have a Google account to leave a comment (although it is useful to have one anyway). Your comment will not appear straightaway, as they come to me to be moderated first, but I will make sure I check regularly and publish them as soon as I can. Please make sure that you are writing in "proper" English (ie nt txt spk), and also, put your FIRST NAME (not your surname, although if there are two people in your group with the same name, the initial of your surname as well would be helpful), and if you are in my group VEl and for Mr Mattia's group NMa in your comment.

28 comments:

megan shinfield said...

The second Longest geographical name that is accepted in the world is “Taumatawhakatangihangak oauauotamateaturipukaka pikimaungahoronukupokaiwhe nua kitanatahu” (85 letters) which is a hill in New Zealand.It is a maori phrase which translates to “place where Tamatea, the man with the big knees, who slid, climbed and swallowed mountains, known as land-eater, played his flute to his loved one”. It was the longest until recently (though the Guinness Book of Records still regards it as the longest); it has most likely now been supplanted by Krung thep maha nakorn amorn ratana kosin­mahintar ayutthay amaha dilok phop noppa ratrajathani burirom udom rajaniwes­mahasat harn amorn phimarn avatarn sathit sakkattiya visanukamprasit in Thailand (163 letters). Megan.S NMa

Anonymous said...

The warmest tempreture ever recorded on Antartica was 3 degrees F.
Rebecca NMA

Anonymous said...

the reason why denby pottery is where it is now is because it is built around alot of clay beds so its easier and cheaper to get clay. Daniel Smith

Miss Ellis said...

A nice start!

Rebecca - what's 3oF in oC?

Megan - I like it... What does the second name mean?

Daniel - I didn't know that, and I like that you've gone for something local.

Anonymous said...

Clouds;
There is a type of cloud called a virga or "fallstreaks". Virga, comes from the latin word for rod, it is any form of precipitation, weather rain,snow that evaporates becfore it reaches the ground. It's failure to reach the ground usualy leaves a wispy or hooked aperance under a cloud. Virga is often associated with high or medium level clouds formations. Ellie VEL

Anonymous said...

Geography derives from the Greek word geographia and basically means "to describe or write about the earth". The first person to use this time was a greek scholar named Eratosthenes, who invented an early version of longitude and latitude, he created a map of the world, calculated the distance from the earth to the sun, and invented the leap day.
Joe M, NMa

Anonymous said...

“Taumatawhakatangihangak oauauotamateaturipukaka pikimaungahoronukupokaiwhe nua kitanatahu” is a hill in New zealand. Daniel O'neill

Anonymous said...

In 1811 and 1812 three earthquakes mesuring around 8 on the richter scale caused the mississppi river to flow backwards! Jessica Brassington

Anonymous said...

The first motorway to be opened in the UK was the 8¼ mile long M6 Preston by-pass.It was opened on the 5th December 1958 by the then Prime Minister, Harold Macmillan.

ryan breen said...

ryan breen. the amazon rain forest produce 20% of our oxygen and the amazon river flows 3 times faster than all the rivers in the united states of america. the volume of the water in the amazon river is as big as the 8 largest rivers in the world and you can still find fresh water 100 miles out to the atlantic ocean. vel

Anonymous said...

The Heage Windmill was built in 1797 and was restored in 2002. This grade 2 listed building is the only working, stone-towered, multi-sailed windmill in England. Amy, VEL

megan shinfield said...

“The land of angels, the great city of immortality, of devine gems, the great angelic land unconquerable land of nine nobel gems, the royal city, a pleasant capital place of the Royal Palace, eternal land of angels and reincarnated spirits predestined and created by the highest Devas.” thats what it translates to :) Megan.S NMa

Paige said...

The Largest volcano can be found in Hawai'i, Big Island. It's name is Mauna Loa, meaning 'Long Mountain'. It's still active after it's last eruption in 1984. From the base to it's peak, Mauna Loa is around 56,000 ft !!

James said...

There is a 1 metre diameter water pipe running through Nether Heage that supplies the cities of Leicester, Derby and Nottingham with their water. James. VEl

Anonymous said...

The largest earthquake ever recorded was in Valdivia, Chile and had a magnitude of 9.5

Connor Kerry

Anonymous said...

The deepest hole ever made in the world is in Texas. It is as deep as 20 Empire State Buildings but only 3 inches wide.

kyle shelton

Anonymous said...

The Vatican city is the smallest country in the world at only .2 square miles. That is smaller than the average city
LIAM MINKLEY

Anonymous said...

Brazil got it's name from the nut, not the other way round.

Kyle

Anonymous said...

The hottest place on earth is dalol, denakil depression in Ethiopia. The annual average tempreture there is 93 degrees f, 34 degrees c.
Joe Noonan

Anonymous said...

The world's only city whose name consists solely of vowels is Aiea, in Hawaii, USA. Molly K - NMa

kieran thrall said...

The average depth of the oceans is about five times the average elevation of the land. In general, the continents stand about three miles above the ocean floor. According to the National Geographic Atlas, the deepest-known part of the ocean measures 10,924 meters (35,839 feet), in the Marianas Trench near Guam. If the world's highest mountain, Mount Everest (29,141 feet), were to be placed into this trench, it would be covered by over 1.25 miles of water.

Anonymous said...

Though Mt. Everest is the highest altitude in terms of sea level on the planet, Mount Chimborazo is the closest to the moon. The Marianas Trench is the lowest place on earth. joe spray

Aaron Cope said...

Antarctica is essentially a desert. The average yearly total precipitation is about two inches Although covered with ice (all but 0.4% of it, i.e.), Antarctica is the driest place on the planet, with an absolute humidity lower than the Gobi desert. Aaron Cope

The wonderful musings of one named 'Hollie'. said...

When would you say the most recent ice age ended? Well, the truth is, we're still in it. In Geography an 'ice age' is defined as a time when there are polar ice caps. Currently, the Earth's climate falls under the category of an 'interglacial' period. This doesn't mean 'between ice ages' as most people think, it actually a word used to describe the period of time within an ice age when the ice retreats due to warmer temperatures.
Hollie NMa.

Thomas M said...

The Shortest place name is ‘Å’ it is located in both Sweden and Norway.‘Å’ means river.
Thomas M.VEL

Anonymous said...

Antarctica is essentially a desert. The average yearly total precipitation is about two inches Although covered with ice (all but 0.4% of it, i.e.), Antarctica is the driest place on the planet, with an absolute humidity lower than the Gobi desert. Aaron.C NMa

Georgia D said...

Buenos Aires, Los Angeles, Cape Town and Sydney are all thousands of miles apart from each other but they are almost identical distances from the Equator. San Francisco and Melbourne (in Australia) both have mild and fast-changing climates but they're the same distance from the Equator as each other, despite being on opposite sides of the world. Georgia D. NMa

Anonymous said...

NMa,
Taumata­whakatangihanga­koauau­o­tamatea­turi­pukakapiki­maunga­horo­nuku­pokai­whenua­kitanatahu is the longest geographical name in the world. The name is for a hill in New Zealand which is 305 meters (1,001 ft) high.
- Amy